Reviews

On Telegram:

Telegram is the kind of zine that made me want to start writing zines in the first place. Maranda writes about their personal experiences with enough distance and care that they become not purging, but rather small maps that can help us look at our own lives and the beauty of how we survive and become more fully the people we want to become.”

On Mend My Dress:

“…composed on a typewriter, and adorned with stickers and markings, Mend My Dress is a personal account of Neely’s life events and how she feels about ’em … The point isn’t that we readers know all the details, it’s that we understand their collective effect when built-up into a feeling, and maybe even relate.”

On Shotgun Seamstress:

Shotgun Seamstress exists for those that realize that punk rock is an idea and a possibility that must be forced open in order to fit everybody that needs it inside. Shotgun Seamstress is for those that understand the necessity of making a refracted reality available to the kids, especially in an era where it seems possible to unearth everything, where there lies no mystery, a barrage of images and icons displayed on computer screens for five seconds until the next thing appears…This is something to hold onto and reread over and over. A six zine blast that manages to blow apart the apathy and restore faith in the idea of punk rock as a strategy for resistance! Creating a separate currency for those that are not interested in replicating boring ideals in underground existences, Shotgun Seamstress is like the best mix tape anyone has ever made, where radical politics are never sidelined for an easier ride, where good times are never in doubt and where subsumed experiences are revealed as real… The Gories and Void, Nasty Facts and X-Ray Spex, Brontez, Vaginal Davis, punk rock. It’s an endless adventure and this is another way in.”

on Mend My Dress:

“…Mend My Dress offers a complex, nuanced, and skillfully constructed picture of multifarious girlhood vulnerability. Although Chestnut writes in a diary-like, stream of consciousness style, her work should not be misinterpreted as simple autobiography; instead, it offers artistic and literary mediation.”

On Telegram:

“Maranda is an engaging writer who looks at the role that self-care plays in their life, while encouraging you to do the same. Telegram contains many questions to encourage self-reflection regarding things like art, home and creativity, and essays on Maranda’s writing process and how it’s part of a larger practice of self-care. These are conversations we should be having, and I’m thankful that Maranda is using their zine to give space to them. This zine is a total keeper, and i Know I’ll revisit when I’m in need of inspiration”

On Ilse Content:

“…one of the most gentle zines to come into my hands. Although gentle is a tricky line to walk, Ilse Content manages to be earnest, sincere, and optimistic without being twee or irrelevant.”

On Ilse Content:

Ilse Content is like a motivational speech to start a revolution. Personal or political, you choose. She doesn’t ask that it be anything like any revolution that came before or that it be grand in scale, she just asks that you really feel life, even when it hurts. The themes remain strong: a reverence for nature, for people, finding ways to love yourself, acknowledging how awful the world can be, but building around it (over it), creating your own existence. There’s also sex and love, heartbreak and the end of the world thrown in, if it wasn’t already tempting.”

On Truckface:

“LB provides a funny, intelligent and excruciatingly real rebuttal to the stereotype that teachers are lazy authorities. It’s all in these zines: the administrative morass that leaves classrooms crowded and uncomfortable, the moments of redemption when students plug into an assignment (maybe with a wig on!), and the constant questioning of self that is necessary for anyone in a leadership position. “

On Truckface:

Truckface is, and has always been, on of the greatest zines out there: LB’s hilarious, poignant, sharply-observed, and sometimes heartbreaking meditations on the challenges and triumphs of being a queer, punk public-school teacher in one of the most underserved school districs in the country will make you stand on your chair and cheer aloud.”